Saudi girls sex

03 Jan

In Saudi culture, the Sharia is interpreted according to a strict Sunni form known as the way of the Salaf (righteous predecessors) or Wahhabism.

The law is mostly unwritten, leaving judges with significant discretionary power which they usually exercise in favor of tribal traditions.

Publicity photos from the launch of Saudi Arabia's new Girls' Council have gone viral for all the wrong reasons — namely, the lack of actual women in attendance.

Saudi Arabia is not known for its strong record on women's rights so the formation of a council, intended to provide women with more opportunities and a voice, was taken to be encouraging.

Saudi Arabia Table of Contents Education has been a primary goal of government in Najd since the late eighteenth century, when the Wahhabi movement encouraged the spread of Islamic education for all Muslim believers.

Because the purpose of Islamic education was to ensure that the believer would understand God's laws and live his or her life in accordance with them, classes for reading and memorizing the Quran along with selections from the hadith were sponsored in towns and villages throughout the peninsula.

They may be required to provide guardian consent in order to work or access healthcare.

Women regularly face difficulty conducting a range of transactions without a male relative, from renting an apartment to filing legal claims.

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Saudi authorities also continued their arbitrary arrests, trials, and convictions of peaceful dissidents.

At the most elementary level, education took place in the , a class of Quran recitation for children usually attached to a mosque, or as a private tutorial held in the home under the direction of a male or female professional Quran reader, which was usually the case for girls.

In the late nineteenth century, nonreligious subjects were also taught under Ottoman rule in the Hijaz and Al Ahsa Province, where schools specializing in Quran memorization sometimes included arithmetic, foreign language, and Arabic reading in the curriculum.

For this reason, the steep rise in literacy rates--by 1990 the literacy rate for men had risen to 73 percent and that for women to 48 percent--must be seen as an achievement.

Students who wished to pursue their studies beyond the elementary level could attend an informal network of scholarly lectures (), hadith, literature, rhetoric, and sometimes arithmetic and history.