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The language associated with them is wholly Jewish; no Pauline or Church language is present.Everything the Lord said was associated with Israel and concerned God’s judgment and how to obtain salvation during those seven years.Renowned Egyptologist Donald Redford concludes, “The almost insurmountable difficulties in interpreting the exodus-narrative as history have led some to dub it ‘mythology rather than . The eminent Egyptologist and Biblical scholar Kenneth Kitchen is foremost among them: “Thus, if all factors are given their due weight, a 13th-century exodus remains—at present—the least objectionable dating, on a combination of all the data (Biblical and otherwise) when those data are rightly evaluated and understood in their context.” Young also opposes this trend: “A date for the exodus in the mid-fifteenth century BC has been much maligned because of favorite theories that identified various pharaohs of a later date with the pharaohs of the oppression and exodus. Does Amenhotep II qualify as the pharaoh who lived through the tenth plague because he was not his father’s eldest son?Could the eldest son of Amenhotep II have died during the tenth plague, which must be true of the exodus-pharaoh’s son?These are the following: 1) acceptance of the Scriptures as God-breathed (θεόπνευστος), 2) correct placement of the text within the framework of God’s progressive revelation, and 3) sound and consistent hermeneutic or interpretative method.The first word of the book is “revelation” (ἀποκάλυψις)–hence its title.

C., aunque otros expertos proponen fechas más tempranas.​ Existen otros escritos, conocidos como evangelios apócrifos, no reconocidos como canónicos por las iglesias cristianas actuales, de manera que estos evangelios apócrifos no son aceptados como fidedignos, ni como textos inspirados por la divinidad.

The present in-depth work examines the trustworthiness of Biblical history by using the Hebrew exodus from Egypt as a test case.

More specifically, an examination of the exodus-pharaoh’s life will reveal whether Biblical history can be harmonized and synchronized with Egyptian history, and whether Biblical chronology is clear and trustworthy when relevant passages are interpreted literally.

Accordingly, questioning the Bible’s historicity is nothing new to Biblical studies, as evidenced by Ladd’s remark, “It is the author’s hope that the reader may be helped to understand that the authority of the Word of God is not dependent upon infallible certainty in all matters of history and criticism.” A prime example is seen in the words of Finkelstein, who speaks of “the rise of the true national state in Judah [in the eighth century BC]. Such a position is unacceptable, and it must be opposed rigorously.

The present work examines the trustworthiness of Biblical history by using the Hebrew exodus from Egypt (hereinafter, simply “exodus”) as a test case.