Precolumbian dating back to

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Please ask if you would like additional photos or more in-depth descriptions. All items being offered on this website have appropriate provenance and are legal to buy and own under the United States statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, Chapter 14. It is quite remarkable that this very large vessel has never been broken. Originally acquired by Chris at a charity auction in Pasadena, CA in the 1970s. These Inca examples are all of similar shape and made of hammered copper. Ample deposits present; a few small areas of white caliche encrustation on one side. Their art shows strong Olmec and Tlatilco influence as is seen in the prominent lips and pierced eyes. A nice example from one of Mesoamerica's earliest cultures. The top section is divided into quadrants each with a central figure. The spout is in the form of a penis with the strap handle attached to the side. One whistle has been returned to working order, the other is non-functioning. The Abrams made their fortune in the publishing business and were avid collectors of fine art and artifacts. Much of their collection was donated to numerous museums. Constructed of reddish earthenware covered overall in a cream slip with red, orange and black painted designs, typical of the type. Approx 4.5" tall x 6.5" across 5 — West Mexico 200 BC - 100 AD A Chinesco seated female figure from the Nayarit region of Western Mexico. The two shown here are incomplete; each is missing a portion of one side. The beaded feather assemblages are repeated along the top of the headdress along with tassels and circular appliques with carved geometric designs. In one hand is a spherical object, likely representing a pottery vessel. 0 — Ecuador 300 BC - 500 AD A Bahia vessel from ancient Ecuador. 0 — El Salvador 400 AD - 700 AD A Maya glyph bowl dating to the Classic Period. Both arms are extended upward in a welcoming gesture. 00 — Peru 900 AD - 1200 AD A Chancay woven textile panel from ancient Peru. The central image is divided by a red band, half in a curving serpent-like design, the other half in a basket-weave pattern. The lower half of the vessel has incised geometric designs known as the 'flame-brow' motif. The flame-brow design originated on Olmec pottery from approximately 1000 years earlier and has also been seen on Maya vessels of eastern Mesoamerica. The surface is an orange buff terracotta with a few areas of fire clouding. A superb example that is larger than most of this type and displays dramatically. An incredibly rare matched set that are massive in size. This very thin-walled vessel shows expert craftsmanship; exceptional construction and is nicely painted with red linear designs against a golden yellow ground. The rounded spherical lower chamber sits on pointy, cone-shaped tripod legs. Surface shows minor wear and paint loss with light erosion, all consistent with age. Large figures of shamans, such as this one, are indicative of their high status in Jamacoaque culture and are often depicted displaying their ceremonial paraphernalia as symbols of power. There are light stains (sticker residue) on both sides. Included is a small, but lovely Maya stone celt, also from the Classic Period. Pendant - Approx 6" tall x 3.5" across x .25" thick. Celt - 1.75" long x 1.25" across x 3/8" thick 5 for both — Costa Rica 200 AD - 600 AD Two Costa Rican Axe God celts (pendants) from the Guanacaste/Nicoya region. It depicts an anthropomorphic figure with hands across the chest. Just under 9" across x 3" tall 0 — Costa Rica 1200 AD - 1500 AD Large Costa Rican "Castillo Incised" blackware tripod rattle vessel dating to the Late Period. 0 — Costa Rica 400 AD - 700 AD Very large Costa Rican tripod rattle vessel from the Central Highlands - Atlantic Watershed Zone, dating to Period IV-V.Every purchase comes with a written certificate of authenticity (COA) and are fully guaranteed to be as described. Shipping options are USPS Priority Mail, UPS Ground and Fed Ex. — Mexico 200 AD - 750 AD An exceptional Teotihuacan vessel dating from the late Tlamimilolpa Phase to the early Metepec Phase. Its size, form and condition make this an amazing example that displays dramatically on the custom metal stand which is included. There are three sizes here, possibly representing different monetary denominations. The surface is also slightly clouded by a salt-lime haze which could be cleaned, but is currently in original, as found condition. The figure is shown seated with one arm outstretched, the other curled to the chest and is wearing a broad collar (necklace), turban style headwrap and large circular earspools. A small portion of the headdress has also been restored, otherwise intact. Two human figures with arms held upward and wearing crescent shaped 'solar' headdresses along with two monkeys (or felines) shown in profile also wearing solar headdresses. At the base of the handle are two ball-shaped objects (appearing as testicles) which form the whistles. A crack in the main body has been stabilized and restored. Minor scrapes and dings present along with deposits and some fire clouding. The remainder was later sold through various art auctions in NYC. A flared bowl sits atop three large jaguar heads, each containing their original rattle balls. The figure is of hollow construction with red, tan and black painted and burnished surface. 0 — Peru 400 AD - 600 AD A large and impressive Moche Phase IV portrait vessel from the Northern Coastal region of ancient Peru. 50 — Costa Rica - Panama 1100 AD - 1450 AD An unusual pottery vessel in the form of an armadillo. 5 — Peru 1000 AD - 1400 AD A Chancay painted bowl from ancient Peru. Outside of the obvious losses, they are intact with nice deposits. The face and hands are painted in yellow-gold pigment, otherwise covered in a cream-tan slip with deposits and some root marks present. Assembled from original pieces (as is common) with break lines restored and minor losses replaced. In the other hand is a five-lobed ceremonial rattle. 0 — Peru 700 AD - 1000 AD A rare Wari aryballo (water transport vessel) from ancient Peru. The vessel is rounded with a flat bottom and has a flared spout. Rounded bottom with corseted sides; an elegant form. He (she) smiles widely exposing filed teeth and has almond shaped eyes. It depicts a central band of stylized birds with rows of waves (water motif) at the top and bottom. The gently curving sides of the bowl are finely painted in diagonal stripes. The back is completely painted with parallel lines in black on tan. Assembled from approximately six original pieces with breaklines partially restored and slightly visible. The cream colored surface is nicely burnished inside and out with areas of orange and black (fire clouding) on one side. Assembled from three original pieces with breaks restored. Minor surface wear, dings and scratches along with light deposits consistent with age. By far the largest examples of this type I have ever seen. Condition is very good, near excellent with a small hairline crack and minor rim chips restored. Around the top of the lower chamber is a band of incised decoration done in a repeating triangular pattern. 7.25" tall x 7" across 50 — Mexico 300 AD - 400 AD A medium-large Teotihuacan tripod vessel dating to the Early Xolalpan Period. Constructed of tan terracotta with orange pigment on the face and nose ornament. Carved from green speckled stone with earthen deposits. The headdress is two alligator heads facing outward. Restoration to the corner of the head and one foot. The exterior is nicely incised with complex geometric patterns. It has pierced tapered tripod legs, each containing numerous small rattle balls.The hypothesis of a migration coming from Paleolithic Europe was also expressed, but until now, it couldn’t be demonstrated.In any case, the initial populations of America were composed of Homo Sapiens, that is to say, of modern humans.For this reason the alternative terms of Precontact Americas, Pre-Colonial Americas or Prehistoric Americas are also in use.In areas of Latin America the term usually used is Pre-Hispanic. Here I will offer quality, yet affordable, authentic artifacts from throughout the Americas. At the base of each handle, upper body of the vessel, are two nicely detailed human figures, lying flat. This type of ancient 'money' was used in the trading (and purchasing) of merchandise by the Inca. Each has a large nose and impressed eyes and mouth. The seated figure has an area of fire clouding on the back and a restored hand. Both are from the same estate collection; they were likely found together and appear to have been made by the same artist. The eyes and nose are sculpted in high relief with pierced nostrils and slit mouth. 0 — Mexico 1200 BC - 800 BC A rare Copilco pottery figure dating to the Middle Pre-classic Period. The upper half of the vessel is intricately carved. 0 — Ecuador 600 BC - 300 BC A very rare Chorrera erotic whistle vessel from ancient Ecuador. 5 — West Mexico 300 BC - 300 AD Two partial obsidian pectorals. Both flutes are in playable condition with nice tones and have two pierced holes used for suspension around the neck. The face is framed with large slab panels that create a massive headdress. He wears elaborate regalia; the headdress features opposing birds with heads turned backward. 0 — Vera Cruz, Mexico 600 AD - 900 AD A rare and exceptional Sonriente figure from the Remojadas region of ancient Veracruz. 17.5" x 9.5" 5 — West Mexico 200 BC - 400 AD A large Nayarit plate (shallow bowl) from ancient West Mexico. 0 — Mexico 400 AD - 750 AD A Teotihuacan tripod vessel from ancient Mexico. The three gracefully curving legs are decorated with stylized bird heads with long beaks, likely representing the heads of pelicans. A chip on the spout is restored, but it is otherwise intact. A few minor scrapes and dings along with light deposits (consistent with age) as would be expected. Smaller than most of this type, but is a really cute piece that displays well. The painting style and motif of each vessel is nearly identical. 3.5" tall x 5" across 5 — Ecuador 1000 AD - 1500 AD A large and exceptional Manteno figural tripod vessel from Pre-Columbian Ecuador. It enabled them to induce shamanic trances and visions. Nicely carved from a greenish-gray stone in the form of a celt. A few edge chips along with minor scrapes and dings, but overall a nice example and rarely seen in this size. Near excellent condition with restoration to one leg; else intact and choice.This gallery will be regularly updated so check back often. The surface is burnished blackware with light deposits, mainly in the crevices. Minor chips missing from the edge of the spout, otherwise completely intact and original with no repairs or restoration. Much like the copper hoe-money (tajaderas) that was used by the Aztecs of Mexico. They wear arm bands, elaborate (tassel-like) ear assemblages and head wraps. The standing figure has a restored hand and partially restored foot. An exceptionally rare, very closely matching pair of ancient figures. The orangeware vessel is painted overall in black and reds with complex geometric designs of linear and angular patterns. One eye is chipped otherwise completely intact with no cracks, breaks or repairs. The Copilco culture was one of the first and most important ceremonial centers in the Valley of Mexico during that time. A wide band at the midsection shows a connected diamond pattern. Constructed of grayish terracotta, burnished overall and painted with faint wide bands (in red) around the outer edge. At the top are two stepped ridges that encircle the spout, loop handle and spherical whistles. 0 — Costa Rica 1200 AD - 1500 AD A beautifully painted 'Pataky Polychrome' tripod vessel from the Nicoya-Guanacaste region of ancient Costa Rica. Nicely knapped from black volcanic glass, these rare and fragile objects were worn as pectorals via two suspension holes. At the lower front, the lord's hands extend outward holding staffs decorated with beaded plumes. He also wears large ear spools and a beaded necklace with multi-layered tassels. Hollow, terracotta construction; it depicts a seated youth with typical gleeful expression. Polychrome painted in the 'fineline' technique with red and black against a tan slip. Townsend's "Ancient West Mexico", page 79, for similar examples and info on this type. A cylindrical bowl sits on three solid rectangular legs. The legs are hollow and contain numerous rattle balls. Light surface wear consistent with age and extended burial, but is intact and original with no repairs or restoration. Most likely found together and probably created (or at least painted) by the same artist. 5.25" tall x 6" across 5 — West Mexico 100 BC - 250 AD A well made Nayarit olla with fine-line decoration. Constructed of gray terracotta clay with areas of brown burnished surfacing. During such altered states of consciousness, shamans would communicate with spiritual beings as well as the deceased, and travel on shamanic journeys in the supernatural realm. Displays well on custom metal stand which is included as shown. A few imperfections but shows nice deposits and has a sharp chiseled edge. Collection of Bernard and Bernadette Lueck, Founders of the Heritage of the Americas Museum in El Cajon, California. Celt 1 (left) - Well carved from a blue-green hardstone showing fine details. A large example with an elegant form that displays beautifully.

precolumbian dating back to-90precolumbian dating back to-83

“We’ve been looking at our ancient culture as if they were deaf and mute,” he said.

Scientists were fascinated by the ghostly find: a human skeleton buried in an Aztec temple with a clay, skull-shaped whistle in each bony hand.

But no one blew into the noisemakers for nearly 15 years.

The first colonizers of the New World took advantage of the isthmus that joined Asia and America during part of the last great glacial period, before being immersed about 11 600 years ago – at the end of the Late Pleistocene.

Their odyssey was probably made easier by the practice of a coastal navigation.