Dating mexican made fender

14 Oct

Please note that fender serial numbers tend to overlap by at least a year, and thereby the date of your guitar can only be approximated. Most notably, production dates have been penciled or stamped on the butt end of the heel of the neck of most guitars and basses, although there were periods when this was not consistently done (1973 to 1981, for example) or simply omitted.USA Squiers: USA Squires are very rare and usually have a E serial number and were made for less than a year spanning 19.Korean Squiers: C refers to Cort, V refers to Saehan(Sunghan), S was already taken by Samick so Saehan(Sunghan) used V instead (Saehan(Sunghan) made the Vester guitars). The second character refers to the decade: N represents Nineties (1990's). So, for example "CN6" = made by Cort in 1996 and "VN6" = made by Saehan(Sunghan) in 1996.Instead, the instrument’s country of origin appears on the decal on the back of the headstock, near the serial number.This new numbering scheme was short-lived and was replaced only a few months later by an improved scheme that identifies an instrument’s country of origin and year of manufacture in the body of the serial number.Given the modular nature of Fender production techniques, an individual neck may have been produced in a given year, then stored for a period of time before being paired with a body to create a complete guitar, perhaps, for example, in the following year.

Neck-dating can be useful in determining the was produced, rather than the complete instrument.Most specifications for a given Fender instrument model change little (if at all) throughout the lifetime of the model.While there have been periods of dramatic change—such as the transition periods between the Leo Fender years and the CBS years or the transition between the CBS years and the current ownership—most models are generally feature-specific and do not change from year to year. Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_input. Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_spinner. On 2 January this year, the CITES law came into force, putting restrictions on how rosewood is traded across international borders - we're now seeing the first effects of the legislation, as Fender announces plans to cut down on its use of the wood.