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23 Oct

Consequently our marriage was not the hasty, impassioned leap of two people soaring on the Icarian wings of a first love.

That which was between us was calm as the night, deep as the sea; in the light of it we both knew that forever afterwards he would look upon other women, and I upon other men, as pale wraiths.

Countless sermons have been wasted on this topic, and its specter has launched numerous fund-raising campaigns for institutions that usually have little clue on how to creatively adapt to a changing community.

As a result, many of our Jewish leaders and even major philanthropists are finding that their grandchildren are not necessarily being raised Jewishly.

But when a widowed Holocaust survivor and close friend of ours wanted to marry another close friend, my wife was supportive; clearly they were not going to have any children. Holding the Jewish community's line on not performing interfaith marriages or the happiness of this couple?

If my wife were a member of the Conservative movement's Rabbinical Assembly, even attending this wedding would be grounds for expulsion.

In the Talmud, interfaith marriage is completely prohibited, although the definition of interfaith is not so simply expressed.

It is not unusual for both Jews and Christians to have misconceptions about each other's religion or to harbor stereotypes.

1899) which documents an event in Ukraine that the artist read about: a Jewish woman was attacked by members of her community for falling in love with a Christian convert.

Interfaith marriage in Judaism (also called mixed marriage or intermarriage) was historically looked upon with very strong disfavour by Jewish leaders, and it remains a controversial issue amongst them today.

In several places in the Jewish Bible, there are relations which appear to be intermarriages - for example, King David is described as marrying the daughter of the king of Geshur, Christine Hayes compares the Deuteronomic and Ezran viewpoints on intermarriage, and discusses in terms of ritual impurity and the fear of profaning the seed of Israel.

First and foremost, Hayes holds that the fear of profaning the seed of Israel was the underlying rationale for the ban in exogamous marriage, rather than the ritual impurity of Gentiles in general.